Text

My eyes water when I am sneezy and have a runny nose. Am I a cat?

Text

Here is an example of either mad bargaining skills or extreme gullibility: I was on Commercial Street today, lugging around something like 10 kgs of clothes, when I came across a dude selling these decorative strings with beads and pompoms and little animals. I made the mistake of stopping and looking and asking the price. “950 for one, but I’ll give it to you for 650.” I smile, shake my head no, and move on. What on earth would I do with it anyways? So I go to the alterations shop (the ever-present embroiderer informs me that the tailor is taking some time off), blouse piece shop (the owner himself attended to me with a charming old-world courtesy), the lace shop, and the dupatta shop before heading off to meet my mother at a preappointed spot. And there that dude finds me again. Please won’t I buy a pair for 650? I shake my head no. At this point I’m really not interested in these things at all. The price drops. 500. 400. 300. This is his no-profit price, apparently. I try to get him to understand that it’s not the price that’s the problem, but I can’t walk away so this is really not getting through to him. Please, I would be his first sale of the day/night. There was a certain amount of desperation. This might have been true. I could give them as gifts! That became a way out. I could always just give them to Jay’s mother, who apparently likes anything with elephants. So I bought them, dear reader. My mother turned up about 15 seconds after he finally left.

Text

Myers Briggs by Mythical Creatures

readingontheroof:

INFJ: Phoenix
ESTP: Centaur
INTJ: Basilisk
ESFP: Pegasus
INFP: Unicorn
ESTJ: Hellhound
INTP: Wizard
ESFJ: Angel
ISFJ: Genie
ENTP: Sea Serpent
ISTJ: Vampire
ENFP: Pixie
ISFP: Siren
ENTJ: Griffin
ISTP: Werewolf
ENFJ: Fairie

(via tearitar)

Photo
explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

(Source: explore-blog, via nobodysuspectsthebutterfly)

Link

mizmahlia:

1. The best book you read last year
2. A book that you’ve read more than 3 times
3. Your favorite series
4. Favorite book of your favorite series
5. A book that makes you happy
6. A book that makes you sad
7. Most underrated book
8. Most overrated book
9. A book you…

Text

I’m trying to watch the India vs. England test match, but am getting rather distracted by nipples. There are all these fabulous pecs in tight white shirts. Sadly, Ishant Sharma isn’t playing this match so my pervy little heart won’t be completely satisfied. His hair! He looks like a grunge god.

Update: I checked, and he’s 25. Thank goodness.

Photo
Farmers perform wedding of donkeys, The Hindu.

Farmers perform wedding of donkeys, The Hindu.

Photo
Fashion advice in a vintage Mills & Boon.

Fashion advice in a vintage Mills & Boon.

Photo
Flying Too High, Kerry Greenwood

Flying Too High, Kerry Greenwood

Photo
Angry bird chappals :)

Angry bird chappals :)