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The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec (2010)

The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec (2010)

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Ooh, double burn. Just got it. Although, if Myrcella was acknowledged as a bastard, would she be of low birth? Isn’t a bastard with a bastard surname (like Ellaria Sand) someone who has been acknowledged by a noble parent? So then they’re not considered someone of low birth or a commoner, yes? Anyway, at this point does everyone in the show acknowledge that they know about Jaime/Cercei and the children? In the books, Stannis did a lot of propaganda, but iirc, no one in King’s Landing was brave enough to bring it up with the Lannisters, and Tywin was very upset about the consequences re. claim to the throne if people began giving the ‘rumors’ any weight. Perhaps we’ll see some of that soon? Otherwise that will be another logic loose end floating about.

(Source: jongritte, via joannalannister)

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Downtown Detroit, Reflection II

Downtown Detroit, Reflection II

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Downtown Detroit, Reflection I

Downtown Detroit, Reflection I

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Today has been a day in which I have more Malayalam than usual swishing around in my head. I was doing some basic vocabulary with Jay, just because, when he asked me what the Malayalam word for sex is. And, you know what, I don’t know. Never had those conversations in Malayalam. Not even in the movies. The movies and newspapers taught me what the word for rape is, and all children know the words for kisses and hugs, but we only ever euphemistically glide around sex. 

Also, Jay and I were talking about movie-watching habits during my childhood, and I realized as I was telling him that it was probably quite strange that we spent a lot of time worrying about fungi (can one call it an infection?) on VHS tapes. We had to be very careful and check the tapes and spray them, otherwise the video wouldn’t play right and the VHS player itself would get infected and pass the fungus onto other tapes. The things one worries about when one lives in a state with monsoons for about half the year. Also, nobody outside of Kerala seems to have heard of that black mold that grows in damp clothes and ends up staining them. There is a very specific name for it. And Jay wonders why I obsess over fungal infections.

A few years back we got my grandmother a dryer. I believe it was the first dryer to be released in India, and it is also probably the worst dryer in the world, but it is such a godsend. No more stringing up clothes in every room in the house and staring at them in desperation because they will not dry during the rainy season when the air is so moist. It is strange, the ordinary things we take for granted that are so extraordinary to others who haven’t experienced them. It is like underground streams, or other planets, or like having to stop talking to translate a word.

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Still life with succulents, mug, and cat.

Still life with succulents, mug, and cat.

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(Source: wetheurban, via myladymother)

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literaryreference:

I just want to take a moment here to appreciate the poetry of Aphra Behn, who was:

  • possibly the first woman in the English-speaking world to make a living as a writer
  • probably bisexual
  • also a spy (no kidding)
  • given to writing poetry that is really homoerotic/blatantly about sex/both

I did learn about her in college, but I missed out on the sexy poetry until now, and now that I have discovered it I feel the need to share some examples, because it’s pretty entertaining. If you like sexy poetry from the 1600s, I mean, but who wouldn’t.

The Disappointment, or, “it’s such a letdown when a guy can’t get it up”

On Her Loving Two Equally, or, “the solution to this one is probably a threesome”

To My Lady Morland at Tunbridge, or, “I was mad that you stole my boyfriend, but now that I’ve seen you I can’t blame him, because damn" (see also "Selinda and Cloris," which is basically the exact same thing)

To the Fair Clarinda, Who Made Love to Me, Imagined More Than Woman, or, “let’s not even try to pretend this poem isn’t about lesbians”

To Mrs. Price (and the appended Song), or, “come join me in the countryside where there is so much sex happening, p.s. I love you and if you don’t love me back I will probably die”

There are more intriguing things that I’ve seen referenced or quoted, but anything outside of her most popular works is kind of hard to find online. Still, interesting stuff! At least, I thought so.

(via notsosilentsister)

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libutron:

Malay red harlequin butterfly | ©Paul Bertner   (Maliau basin, Borneo)
Paralaxita damajanti (Riodinidae) has a striking appearance, but unlike other butterflies that occupy sunlit areas and use brilliant colors to attract the attention of potential mates, to advertise their unpalatability, or to confuse, startle or warn avian predators, the Malay red harlequin is very difficult to locate, and it is normally seen only as a silhouette in the shadowy undergrowth, and where it’s flight is so quick and erratic that it is almost impossible to see where it has settled.
The explanation for the striking appearance could be connected to the fact that insects can see well beyond the visible spectrum, into the ultra-violet. In semi darkness the butterfly is almost invisible to mammalian, reptilian or avian eyes, but the distinctive pattern and contrasting colours may reflect a strong ultra-violet trademark that could be essential to enable potential mates to locate each other.
This species occurs in dense rainforest in peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra and Borneo. The early stages appear to be unknown. 
[Source]

So is this butterfly named after Damayanti? If so, cool! But why? I don’t think her story has anything to do with butterflies or camouflage. Although she is very beautiful. 

libutron:

Malay red harlequin butterfly | ©Paul Bertner   (Maliau basin, Borneo)

Paralaxita damajanti (Riodinidae) has a striking appearance, but unlike other butterflies that occupy sunlit areas and use brilliant colors to attract the attention of potential mates, to advertise their unpalatability, or to confuse, startle or warn avian predators, the Malay red harlequin is very difficult to locate, and it is normally seen only as a silhouette in the shadowy undergrowth, and where it’s flight is so quick and erratic that it is almost impossible to see where it has settled.

The explanation for the striking appearance could be connected to the fact that insects can see well beyond the visible spectrum, into the ultra-violet. In semi darkness the butterfly is almost invisible to mammalian, reptilian or avian eyes, but the distinctive pattern and contrasting colours may reflect a strong ultra-violet trademark that could be essential to enable potential mates to locate each other.

This species occurs in dense rainforest in peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra and Borneo. The early stages appear to be unknown. 

[Source]

So is this butterfly named after Damayanti? If so, cool! But why? I don’t think her story has anything to do with butterflies or camouflage. Although she is very beautiful. 

(via koryos)

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Old St. Mary’s Church, Detroit

Old St. Mary’s Church, Detroit